Nomadic bloggers need each other… & bloggers in the communities they serve.

I suspect this is a ritual undertaken by most blog novices… a very early stab at blogging about blogging, which inevitably falls far short of the mark! Fortunately humanitarian and development workers are fascinating people that makes such a compilation a true pleasure.

Forgetting the numerous blogs that appear to be acting more as portals to information on a specific place or organisation there are an ever increasing number of single issue or single interest blogs clearly designed to change attitudes and help drive advocacy. Anita Roddick has an interesting advocacy blog at HIV is everyones problem, then there are the informative NGO blogs for example Aids Orphans Rising. What concerns me more is that since we are purportedly focused on supporting self reliance, local response, sustainability in development, humanitarian and development bloggers need to find a way to proactively support local advocacy initiatives, lets at least conciously seek out and promote the best!

Of course it is a pleasure to surf the numerous personal blogs from those starting out in their careers Erika in Lanka, to professionals on the ground Dili-Dallying, and mozamblog from a US physician. Then there are nuggets tucked away like delightful child stories by Sahelsteve at Voice in the Desert and the entertaining Lucky White Girl. Sadly these can be temporal affairs, Sleepless in Sudan shutdown in February 2006 on the authors departure, this just demonstrates one way in which the blogging humanitarian community can gain by keeping close and in touch. We need each other like any nomadic population.

Sadly, or rather fortunately we also work, dedicated blogs will become ever more valuable sources of networking and information, and encourage non-tech familiar workers to set up support sites. Tsunami is a good example, others seem to be more organisation focused, but they are not the worse for it, te comprehensive ODI site is now complimented by a blog. Although I note it is questionable whether an edited organisational blog is just that.

Of course the true stalwarts of blogging must be those individuals who singlehandedly mix work and prose craft through dogedly registering essential documents, updating us on exiting developments and keeping us informed of trends. Humanitarian.info by Paul Currion gets my award for now… but I am only just out of Afghanistan so it may get knocked off my top spot in the next few months!

I have no doubt that participatory media in its many forms from blogs and wiki’s to podcasts (and thats just for now!) will transform the way the humanitarian and development communities communicate, share and manage information and advocate on critical issues. We are really just at the start of this shift, ever the optimist, I am confident it it will also ensure a better understanding and closer relationships between nomadic humanitarian and development workers and the communities they seek to serve.

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